Remembering SynC (my Synthesizer)

Ric's Synth Sampler Design

This is a part picture of my software synth created using SynC.  Very similar to reactor … well the previous version of reaktor I guess.  Basically the synth design is a combination of a synth and sampler.  Very similar to a Korg Triton Extreme or a Roland X8 or a Yamaha Motif XS or XF.  Very challenging and interesting project in music technology as you will be able to understand the basics of synthesis.

Ric’s Synth Sampler is not only a modular synthesizer on software but a combination of a synth and a sampler in one package.  A combination based on the laboratory exercises done on the module Music Technology Systems employing different synthesis methods like :  subtractive synthesis,  additive synthesis, noise and sample based synthesis and advance modulation synthesis. Then, partly based on commercially available synth and sampler designs from Korg, Yamaha and Roland the top 3 giants in synthesizer manufacturing and design.

Synthesis Methods Employed:

1.   Subtractive Synthesis – simply filtering out the harmonics of   a rich waveform to varying degrees. (sound recording practice Borwick 4th Edition)

  1. LFO- tremolo
  2. LFO-vibrato
  3. Low Pass Filter
  4. Filter Modulation
  5. Filter Envelope

2.  Noise and Sample based Synthesis  – this is sometimes called sample replay.  Simply playing back the seed waveforms which are sampled sounds or instruments instead of the fundamental waveform such as the sine wave in subtractive and additive synthesis. (Wikipedia)

  1. Noise
  2. Samples
  3. Drum machines

3.  Additive Synthesis – sounds are built by giving harmonics individual envelopes, rather than by filtering.  However, the phase relationship between harmonics has to be controllable as well as their relative levels to work usefully. (sound recording practice Borwick 4th Edition)

4. Advance Modulation Synthesis – FM Synthesis, AM Synthesis and Ring Modulation Synthesis.

The Synth Sampler Signal Flow

Keyboard —>Pitch Bend —> osc1, osc2, sampler, noise generator, drum sampler, drum machine—>  modulators (vibrato, fm, tremolo, ring and am)  —> combine them all with selector combiner —>  add the L/R outputs  —>  ADSR module—>  envelope generator with filter editing —>  MIDI Amp —>  Master volume controller L/R —>  compressor —>  then Final output L/R

REFERENCES:

Book:  Borwick, J., 1994, 4th Edition, Sound Recording Practice, Oxford University Press,  Oxford, New York.

Website: Fourier Making Waves, Phet, University of Colorado, Boulder

http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/fourier

Website :  GAN SEUM-LIM B.Sc. (Hons.), 1992, Digital Synthesis of Musical Sounds

http://xenia.media.mit.edu/~gan/Gan/Education/NUS/Physics/MScThesis/Chapter1.html

Website:  LS Innovative Synthesis,

http://www.innovativesynthesis.com/types-of-synthesizers/

Lecture Notes : Music Technology Systems, lecture notes 6 and 2,  2010, Subtractive Synthesis & Modulation Synthesis, Salford University.

Book : Russ, M. , 2004, 2nd edition,  Sound Synthesis and Sampling, Focal Press, Oxford OX2 8DP.

Website :  Wikipedia

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One response to “Remembering SynC (my Synthesizer)

  1. Reblogged this on Evangel Ric Lapore and commented:

    Synthesis in Music Technology (Synthesizer I’ve Created)

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